Sean Crosswater 18

Coming Soon: The Best Golf Resources (For When You’re Not on the Course)

Let’s face it, we all have to make a living somehow, and unfortunately for us, that probably doesn’t mean playing golf 4 hours a day.

So in order to give us our golf fix for when we’re not on the course, we’ve gotta find some resources to entertain us!

For the last three months the team here (Liz and I) have been scouring the interwebs to find the best of the best when it comes to golf on the internet.

Why?

We’re putting together a free book that has one goal: give you a plethora of the best resources online to tide you over until you’re able to hit the links for your next round.

Breaking Eighty Best Books Sneak Peak

A little sneak peak of our Top 10 Books

Why am I telling you this?

Well, the book is about 85% of the way done, but we want to make sure we didn’t miss anything. SO what are your favorite golf resources online?

Here are some ideas for the different categories we’re including:

  • Best golf books
  • Best blogs
  • Best golf lists (top 100, top 10 etc)
  • Best podcasts
  • Best video blogs
  • Best publications
  • Best facebook pages
  • Best twitter personalities
  • Best place for Tour coverage
  • Anything else we’re missing!

We want to create the definitive resource for all golf lovers out there, and make it as entertaining as possible to read through.

SO, here’s what we need from you:

LEAVE A COMMENT on this post telling us your favorite resources. If you want to be really awesome, then also tell us what you’d like to see on this site.

It’s brand new, so we want to make sure we’re covering whatever you want to see.  There will always be a ton of golf course reviews, because well, I love golf courses. But what else do you want to see?

Thanks for your support and feedback!




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  1. Daniel Jarvis

    My favorite golf books are “Swing Easy, Hit Hard” by the late, great Julius Boros and “Golf My Way” by Jack. While Boros seems to advocate hitting with the hands, and Nicklaus advocates passive hands, reading both should give anyone good insight on their own swing, especially in regards to tempo. I know these are older books, and that the golf swing has changed so much over the years, but Tom Watson was one 8ft putt away from winning the British Open at the age of 59 a few years ago, and Jack almost won the Masters at age 58 in 1998 on an arthritic hip that was replaced the very next year, so I have a feeling those old swings still have merit.


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